Thank you. I am 81 and started the CBD drops night and morning. I sleep better and no longer suffer the excruciating pain from diverticulitis. I saw somewhere that for my asthma I need the THC so got some (totally illegal here in South Africa). I think it is helping. The diagnosis of COPD was made some years ago and as a health psychologist I do all I can to remain healthy for my 97th birthday!! (Both my grandmother and greatgrandmother did so I believe I will too).

I love the cherry mango gummies. The balm is Great for pain at local areas. The sprays and peels are great for sleep issues or anxiety. I am a doctor and use it. For patients and myself. Great company and fairly priced and GRAS certified so I know what I am giving my patients. People generally love the products and come back and buy more without any sales pitch. The product sells itself people love it

Most drug interactions are in the 3A4 enzyme.  You have no problems there. But candesartan is a strong inhibitor of 2D6.  CBD is an inhibitor of 2D6.  So, yes, they will boast each other.  But you have several options. 1) Use CBD as a boaster, and lower you dose of candesartan, 2) take one in the morning, one in the evening; or 3) Irbesarten is a moderate inhibitor of 2D6.  Losartan, Telmisartan, Valsartan and Eprosartan do not used 2D6.
Please note that none of the presented products or services haven’t been evaluated by FDA as yet hence they are not intended to offer an alternative or substitute for a proper medical diagnose, a proper medical /surgical treatment or to prevent /cure certain illness conditions. For best results, you must contact your doctor after doing your own homework and why not, reading various feedbacks found easily all over the web. The info found on this page will not substitute a proper medical advice hence treat them as such, no matter you are considering a product that will help you lose weight, a success story or when quoting other publications or TV shows.
When looking at the chemical impacts of CBD oil, the answer is no. Cannabidiol is not physically addictive in the same way opiates, cocaine, alcohol, and other drugs can be. Also, CBD oil does not produce any physical withdrawal symptoms when you stop using it. In fact, CBD oil is currently being researched as a potential tool for minimizing the severe withdrawal from drugs like opiates.
Currently, the only CBD product approved by the Food and Drug Administration is a prescription oil called Epidiolex. It's approved to treat two types of epilepsy. Aside from Epidiolex, state laws on the use of CBD vary. While CBD is being studied as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and anxiety, research supporting the drug's benefits is still limited.
So, what is the best way to use CBD oil? CBD comes in a variety of forms, such as oil, tincture, oil for vaping, sublingual spray, edibles, and topical creams, so you can choose the method that is most suitable for your use. The main idea behind all the methods of using CBD is to make sure that this cannabinoid ends up in your system in an easy manner, producing the results you want. But when it comes to choosing the right method, it depends very much on the optimal dose in your case, the results you wish to achieve, and how long you want its effects to last. So, there isn’t a general rule when it comes to using CBD products.
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