My mother has dementia/Alzheimers along with a broken knee that they will not repair do to her mental status.  She is currently in a nursing home.  I firmly believe her mental situation began with the over use of hydrocodone for over 30 years and was acerbated by the trauma of breaking and disconnecting her knee cap. Since weaning her off of her meds (still in progress) we have regained much of her consciousness.  I want to try CBD to help in her recovery or to help slow down the disease. I cannot find a dosage recommendation plus the nursing home/doctor does not recommend it.  I would need to give it to her when I am there visiting (about 3 – 4 times per week).  Is there a recommended dosage for dementia/Alzheimers?

PharmaHemp is a true all-rounder because it can do all sorts of products extremely well: CBD extracts, pastes, natural balms and innovative formulas like this customers’ favourites: the Premium Black full-spectrum e-liquids, the lip balm and the CBD drops with turmeric and black pepper. The latter is a very popular formula that sees the action of the turmeric synergise with the black pepper and CBD, increasing its bioavailability. It can be used topically, via sublingual application, or ingested. Third-party testing demonstrates the purity and integrity of PharmaHemp’s products.


When it comes to using CBD, questions keep coming up, especially from people who try CBD for the first time. Since there are different CBD products and because CBD can be used in different ways, the question of how to use CBD oil is quite legitimate.  What CBD products are available, how they can be used, and the bioavailability of each product is covered in this article.
Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

×