And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.

BioBloom Hemp believes that their range of drops, 4%, 6% and 8% extracts, are all you need. Not only if you’re getting started with CBD oil, but also if you’re looking to take a high-strength concentrate. How can you accomplish a 40% effect (the strongest available) with a 4% concentrate? You would just need to take more of it; so, instead of taking 1 drop of a 40% CBD, you take 10 drops of BioBloom’s 4% CBD drops. The CBD content is the same, but BioBloom says that this equivalence comes with an added benefit: you get more of the full-spectrum cannabinoid profile. In other words, by taking more of the oil, you take in more cannabinoids, thus enhancing the effect of the main active ingredient.

That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.

The method that allows the most absorption is the sublingual application of the oil (under the tongue). Take your drops in front of a mirror (to make sure you get the correct dose) place them under your tongue and keep them there for 2-3 minutes before swallowing the remaining oil with a drink. We recommend following it with breakfast or dinner to further increase absorption (and to get rid of the taste in the back of your throat). Combine it with other CBD products like hemp tea or an e-liquid for an even stronger effect.


CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.
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