Truth be told, one of the biggest draws to using CBD oil for pain has been the fact that it has little distinguishable side-effects or contraindications with other medications. In fact, in a massive report that was published by the World Health Organization during last year’s 2017 Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, it was (finally) declared to the world that CBD is a “safe, well tolerated [compound, which] is not associated with any significant adverse public health effects.”
While hemp-derived CBD sourced from marijuana plants still remains subject to individual state laws, when sourced from hemp products, CBD can be purchased and consumed in all 50 states as long as it is grown in accordance with the Act. This means that CBD’s legal status on a federal level is quite clear, however, on a state level there’s some variation.
We’ve already looked at some of the research behind CBD’s anti-inflammatory benefits — but its role in preventing inflammation may go well beyond treating pain. Scientists have known for a long time that chronic inflammation is related to the development of cancer, and multiple studies have linked taking anti-inflammatory drugs to a significant decrease in cancer development. CBD fills this role without the possible side effects of NSAIDs like Naproxen or Ibuprofen.
It is worth noting though, that hemp seed oil actually does have plenty of health benefits on its own. For example, they are rich in healthy fats and essential fatty acids, including Omega-3 and Omega-6 acids. They can also be a good source of protein, and are known to contain high amounts of vitamin E, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron and zinc.
Hemp-derived CBD oil products will not get you "high" since they contain little or no THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. They are also now federally legal in the United States following the signing of the 2018 Farm Bill. More medical research studies are needed, but we expect that these products will continue to gain even more mainstream acceptance over time.
If your intention is to help treat chronic pain, then you may want to start out with a lower dose, and then proceed from there. If you notice effective results, you can downsize the dose, or likewise you can always up the dose until positive results are achieved. The key is to only increase your dosage in small increments so that you are able to pinpoint exactly how much CBD oil it takes to treat your condition. Be advised, though, that you should not exceed the recommended daily doses that are listed on the bottle and you should consult with a physician.
In 1970, the U.S. government passed the Controlled Substances Act, a statute that regulates all cannabis, including industrial hemp. However, the definition of marijuana was lifted from the existing 1937 statute and adopted without any change. This definition excluded certain parts of hemp — sterilized hemp seed, hemp fiber, and hemp seed oil — from regulation.

Some historians believe that cannabis was restricted due to the publication of the book entitled The Black Candle, by Emily Murphy, in 1922. Emily Murphy was a police magistrate and suffragist who often wrote for Maclean’s Magazine under the pen name Janey Canuck. Her arguments were based on information from anti-drug reformers and police officers, and her book invoked panic after she referred to a “new drug called marijuana” being popular amongst immigrants. Ms. Murphy used numerous prohibitionist anecdotes to show how immigrants, particularly the Chinese, would corrupt the white race.
it’s crazy the amount of disparity out there in terms of quality of cbd oil. you could get 30 different cbd oil brands easily and 30 different qualities, depending solely on the cannabis that was used for extraction, type of extraction used, etc. Guess it’s no different than any other food really, all wine is made from grapes (is it?), doesn’t mean that quality of all wine is the same
Bluebird Botanicals’ pet tincture (“Companion Oil”) offers 250 mg of CBD per 30 ml bottle, and the CBD is carried in organic hemp seed oil — a source of omega 6 and 3. The tincture has a stronger flavor than some, but customer reviews are positive, and the company stands behind their products with a solid return policy for your first purchase. Lab tests are also both easy to find and up-to-date.
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