CBD oil is not legal everywhere. It is banned/restricted by countries such as UAE, Dubai, and Saudi Arabia. Although CBD oil is illegal in many of the US states too, some have legalized its use for medicinal purposes. While the number would be ever-changing, as of 2016 there are 17 states in the US which have legalized the use of low THC, high CBD products for medical reasons in limited situations. These states include Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. It is advisable to consult your local health specialist before use. 

I tried the 3600mg bottle which contains 120ml of liquid in a bottle made from premium quality glass. The cinna-mint flavor has a refreshing taste and, like all Elixinol hemp oil products, it is a full spectrum cannabinoid extract which includes natural molecules such as Alkanes, Sugars, Amino Acids, Ketones, Flavonoids, Vitamins, and more (you can check out the Certificate of Analysis on the website). It also contains coconut extract to help with bioavailability.

As more and more states legalize the use of marijuana, a product known as CBD oil has surged in popularity. A chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is non-intoxicating and does not cause the noticeable euphoric effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC, another marijuana compound). Products marketed as CBD oil may contain THC.


How does it work, you might ask? The alkaloids (the active substances in this oil) are responsible for lowering overall inflammation in the body and stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, both of which are responsible for kicking the body into “rejuvenation mode” and “recovery mode”. This is the simplest and most concise definition we can give you without explaining a whole medical book to you.
It has proved to be pretty useless at treating anything apart from limited success with Multiple sclerosis (MS)spasticity and even then the results are not impressive. As early as October 2014, NICE published guidance on the management of MS and said that the substantial cost of Sativex “compared to the modest benefit” did not justify its use. Paying for it privately will cost you about £350 a month.
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