John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, and publisher who earned his English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Urbana (USA). He is the co-founder of a literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and calls the most beautiful places in the world his office. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.


How does it work, you might ask? The alkaloids (the active substances in this oil) are responsible for lowering overall inflammation in the body and stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, both of which are responsible for kicking the body into “rejuvenation mode” and “recovery mode”. This is the simplest and most concise definition we can give you without explaining a whole medical book to you.
Improving the appearance of the skin, especially reducing the signs and symptoms of acne and eczema, are the great benefits of regular CBD oil use. Topical application is quite popular for this, whether in a diluted or undiluted form, depending on the severity of the skin affliction. The powerful anti-inflammatory properties of the oil can also soothe redness, itchiness, and swollen areas of the skin.

Always striving to source full-spectrum products (rich in other synergetic cannabinoids like CBDa), when Love Hemp launched, it focused on bringing fine organic hemp oils from the EU, particularly from the Czech Republic, into the UK market. For a while, they partnered with Endoca, who allowed them to source organic hemp material from mainland Europe which they would white label under their premium brand in the UK. Later on, when cannabis legislation changed in the USA, they tested Colorado-grown organic hemp from a company called Folium and, because of their guaranteed high quality, they decided this would become the principal source of their CBD hemp oils. All Love Hemp products are THC free (below the 0.2% allowed by UK law), non-addictive, non-toxic and third-party tested for purity.


It has proved to be pretty useless at treating anything apart from limited success with Multiple sclerosis (MS)spasticity and even then the results are not impressive. As early as October 2014, NICE published guidance on the management of MS and said that the substantial cost of Sativex “compared to the modest benefit” did not justify its use. Paying for it privately will cost you about £350 a month.
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