As more and more states legalize the use of marijuana, a product known as CBD oil has surged in popularity. A chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is non-intoxicating and does not cause the noticeable euphoric effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC, another marijuana compound). Products marketed as CBD oil may contain THC.

So is it worth it to buy pure CBD oil or spend the money on a top-shelf product, with no medicinal "guarantee" that it will have therapeutic effects? That's a decision that you'll have to make personally, but let us leave you with this bit of food for thought: as of June 2018, the FDA has approved its first-ever natural CBD extract (Epidiolex) for prescription use, and many have said that this will just be the tip of the iceberg in terms of high-profile health organizations beginning to attest to the true positive qualities of CBD oil and other CBD-based hemp extracts.
The use of CBD is safe, with a few non-serious potential side effects. This is shown by the studies and that is what doctors and scientists say. Most CBD users do not experience any of these side effects. Even in very high doses of CBD there is no toxicity. However, everyone is unique and the body chemistry of each individual is slightly different.
It is recommended that you source a full spectrum CBD oil rather than a CBD crystal isolate if you wish to buy CBD oil medications, and that you are aware of the CBD percentage. If you choose to purchase even a 5% concentration from any of the snake oil salesmen, sorry – suppliers previously mentioned you will have to take 4 capsules at a time to even get remotely near the minimum recommended percentage levels for effective treatment and these will not be full spectrum.

It has proved to be pretty useless at treating anything apart from limited success with Multiple sclerosis (MS)spasticity and even then the results are not impressive. As early as October 2014, NICE published guidance on the management of MS and said that the substantial cost of Sativex “compared to the modest benefit” did not justify its use. Paying for it privately will cost you about £350 a month.

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