Transparency: cbdMD seems to be going through a transition with their third-party testing practices. Until recently, they only released a lab report for the CBD concentrate they use for all their products, but would not show potency testing for individual products. That seems to be changing. Currently, the only lab report on the website is for their concentrate (and it’s over a year old). But if you contact customer service, they’ll send you a lab report for any product. 
Buying online is less reliable still because there’s no regulation or standardization. What you see on the label may not be what you are getting. A 2017 study in JAMA found that of the 84 CBD products researchers bought online, 43 percent had more CBD than indicated, while 26 percent had less, and some had unexpected THC.“There’s a 75 percent chance of getting a product where the CBD is mislabeled,” says Marcu, one of the study’s coauthors.
CannabiGold’s unique selling point is not its oil, however, but its method of application. A common customer issue is droppers leaking because, when the highly viscous oil gets in the rim of a conventional dropper, it is not easy to close the bottle tightly anymore. By listening to their customers and conducting research and testing in their state-of-the-art facilities, the R&D team at CannabiGold developed a precise dropper technology that would allow 10g of CBD oil to be delivered in 400 micro drops, one at a time.
Our bodies are thought to produce endocannabinoids by the billions every day. “We always thought the ‘runner’s high’ was due to the release of dopamine and endorphins. But now we know the euphoria is also from an endocannabinoid called anandamide,” its name derived from the Sanskrit word for bliss, says Joseph Maroon, MD, clinical professor and vice chairman of neurosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We produce these natural chemicals all day, but they fade quickly because enzymes pop up to destroy them. That’s where CBD comes in: By blocking these enzymes, CBD allows the beneficial compounds to linger.
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [46, 48].

CBD works by attaching itself to specific receptors of the body’s own endocannabinoid system. The human body is known to produce cannabinoids of its own, which affect the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The CB1 receptors are generally found in the brain, and deal with pain, mood and emotions, movement, appetite, among others. THC acts upon the CB1 receptors. Meanwhile, CB2 receptors are more commonly found throughout the immune system, affecting inflammation and thus pain. CBD is thought to act upon these receptors, by influencing the body to produce its own cannabinoids in order to rebalance itself.
I bought a bottle of the gold “higher” concentrate to help me with insomnia. I also bought the gold salve for sciatic pain. The salve does nothing for me. Too expensive to have zero effect on my pain. The pills make me feel relaxed, but not enough to make me fall asleep and shut my mind off. They are not concentrated enough. I have to take at least two to feel any kind of effect, but normally 3. Not worth the price to me. Personally, I feel the product has very low effectiveness and I’m disappointed I spent $100 on bith the tiny bottle, mg, and salve. The only thing the pills do are help me relax better.
I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
So is it worth it to buy pure CBD oil or spend the money on a top-shelf product, with no medicinal "guarantee" that it will have therapeutic effects? That's a decision that you'll have to make personally, but let us leave you with this bit of food for thought: as of June 2018, the FDA has approved its first-ever natural CBD extract (Epidiolex) for prescription use, and many have said that this will just be the tip of the iceberg in terms of high-profile health organizations beginning to attest to the true positive qualities of CBD oil and other CBD-based hemp extracts.
When people think of fluoride being prescribed for medicinal purposes, they generally think of fluoride supplementation to reduce tooth decay. Fluoride, however, has also been prescribed as a drug to reduce the activity of the thyroid gland. Up through the 1950s, doctors in Europe and South America prescribed fluoride to reduce thyroid function in patients with over-active thyroids (hyperthyroidism). (Merck Index 1968). Doctors selected fluoride as a thyroid suppressant based on findings linking fluoride to goitre, and, as predicted, fluoride therapy did reduce thyroid activity in the treated patients. (McClaren 1969; Galletti 1958; May 1937). Moreover, according to clinical research, the fluoride dose capable of reducing thyroid function was notably low — just 2 to 5 mg per day over several months. (Galletti & Joyet 1958). This dose is well within the range (1.6 to 6.6 mg/day) of what individuals living in fluoridated communities are now estimated to receive on a regular basis. (DHHS 1991).
Improving the appearance of the skin, especially reducing the signs and symptoms of acne and eczema, are the great benefits of regular CBD oil use. Topical application is quite popular for this, whether in a diluted or undiluted form, depending on the severity of the skin affliction. The powerful anti-inflammatory properties of the oil can also soothe redness, itchiness, and swollen areas of the skin.

Hey I take Klonopin and Zoloft for depression and anxiety as well as Celebrex and Robaxin. I was thinking of trying CBD oil for my psoriatic arthritis pain in my joints and hips. I also had disc replacement surgery last year on my L4 and L5. It helped a lot but I still have back pain thanks to that. I am currently taking opioids as well and would love to drop the opioids permanently as I hate taking them. I plan on talking this over with my pain dr before I do it but can anyone tell me if they have had negative interactions with those prescription meds I listed above? I know not to take this as medical advice. That is for my doctor but I just wanted to know if anyone has used CBD oil with these meds and what the results were for THEM. Also, I feel I am completely out of my depth with CBD oil. I never really even smoked marijuana before except maybe once or twice in my youth many years ago. I’m 46 now. Any help with how I am supposed to figure all this out would be appreciated. I have no idea what I’m doing. Thanks.
I’m 87. Have lived with Trigeminal Neuralgia for 17 years. At first Tegretol helped a little but disease worsened and Tegretol damages liver. Went to legal Dronabinol(THC) with doc’s prescription. Insurance paid. CVS provided 2.5mg pill. THC Stopped pain, and no side effects.  Also have tried CBD oil with 1200mgs per ounce. 2 drops sublingual. Not a good taste but I am without pain using CBD at 1200mgs per ounce.  It also means I now have only a negligible amt of THC in my body.
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