In fact, not only will CBD not make you high, it has been proven to counteract the psychoactivity of THC. This property makes CBD highly useful as a medical treatment for a wide range of conditions. In terms of the CBD products you can buy, the amount of THC present varies from none at all in a pure CBD Isolate to a minimal amount (less than 0.3%) in a Full-Spectrum CBD product.
Hello. I have stage 4 thyroid, secondary lymphoma..And many other health issues.I use 50mg of cbd vapor oil. 5 drops with each use. Total equals 250mg, about hits per dose, three times a day. I’m also on subsys, which is fentanyl. Idk about anyone but myself, but it’s helped me with pain, with sleep, and in general my moods. So I dint have anything negative to say. I just hope that with time, proper diet, low dose chemo, and some other herbal usage, that I can shirk some of the cancer eating at my body… Thanks and good luck to you all.

Nabiximols (Sativex), a multiple sclerosis drug made from a combination of TCH and CBD, is approved in the United Kingdom and Canada to treat MS pain. However, researchers think the CBD in the drug may be contributing more with its anti-inflammatory properties than by acting against the pain. Clinical trials of CBD are necessary to determine whether or not it should be used for pain management.
Did you get an answer for this? I have the exact same scenario. I’m treating my TN with Tegretol, and recently tried CBD. I think I took too much and there are some weird drug interactions with Tegretol and I felt quite stoned….was alone and talking to myself in my head thinking I was Einstein. It freaked me out a bit but I think I took too much. I’m trying lower doses again as recently my TN seems to be resisting the meds, although I have had a lot of emotional stress, which seems to be a trigger. Thanks!! Anna 

Both varieties contain CBD and THC (albeit at different levels), which are the two primary compounds in the Cannabis sativa plant. The Cannabis plant is also very diverse, as it can grow in many different forms. The most common types are Sativa and Indica, but there are more, with each type having dozens – if not hundreds – of different adaptations and different ratios of active compounds, also known as cannabinoids.
This is apparently not typical, but I have met a few other “bad back people taking opioids” with similar complaints.  I have researched that CBD shuts down certain liver enzymes (like CYP2D6 and other CYP450 family enzymes) that allow the liver to process Tramadol and many other meds to the metabolite form that actually relieves pain.  So for my particular chemistry CBD was essentially blocking the pain relief from the Tramadol.

There are certain medications, known as “prodrugs,” that need to be metabolized to produce the therapeutic compound. In other words, you ingest an inactive compound and once in the body, it is processed into the active drug. If this processing is dependent on CYP3A4 (part of the larger CYP450 system), then inhibitors can result in too little active drug in the body for the desired therapeutic effect.
So, what is the best way to use CBD oil? CBD comes in a variety of forms, such as oil, tincture, oil for vaping, sublingual spray, edibles, and topical creams, so you can choose the method that is most suitable for your use. The main idea behind all the methods of using CBD is to make sure that this cannabinoid ends up in your system in an easy manner, producing the results you want. But when it comes to choosing the right method, it depends very much on the optimal dose in your case, the results you wish to achieve, and how long you want its effects to last. So, there isn’t a general rule when it comes to using CBD products.
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