I have been taking full spectrum Hemp CBD oil (1000mg)(Green Gold CBD) sublingually for two months, a daily dosage of 50mg. I had no noticeable side effects. The other morning I took 100 mg to see if it changed anything with respect to some back pain I was experiencing. At lunch I had explosive diarrhea which lasted for several hours. It went away over night. Today, I went online and learned that 10% of CBD get similar problems.
Hey I take Klonopin and Zoloft for depression and anxiety as well as Celebrex and Robaxin. I was thinking of trying CBD oil for my psoriatic arthritis pain in my joints and hips. I also had disc replacement surgery last year on my L4 and L5. It helped a lot but I still have back pain thanks to that. I am currently taking opioids as well and would love to drop the opioids permanently as I hate taking them. I plan on talking this over with my pain dr before I do it but can anyone tell me if they have had negative interactions with those prescription meds I listed above? I know not to take this as medical advice. That is for my doctor but I just wanted to know if anyone has used CBD oil with these meds and what the results were for THEM. Also, I feel I am completely out of my depth with CBD oil. I never really even smoked marijuana before except maybe once or twice in my youth many years ago. I’m 46 now. Any help with how I am supposed to figure all this out would be appreciated. I have no idea what I’m doing. Thanks.
BioBloom Hemp believes that their range of drops, 4%, 6% and 8% extracts, are all you need. Not only if you’re getting started with CBD oil, but also if you’re looking to take a high-strength concentrate. How can you accomplish a 40% effect (the strongest available) with a 4% concentrate? You would just need to take more of it; so, instead of taking 1 drop of a 40% CBD, you take 10 drops of BioBloom’s 4% CBD drops. The CBD content is the same, but BioBloom says that this equivalence comes with an added benefit: you get more of the full-spectrum cannabinoid profile. In other words, by taking more of the oil, you take in more cannabinoids, thus enhancing the effect of the main active ingredient.
The major problem with CBD bottles on the open market is that in most cases they will contain levels of THC which are higher than the amount legally allowed to sell. This means that in most states (with only a few exceptions such as California, Colorado and Oregon), THC is currently legally available only as Medical Cannabis, and should be sold only by legit dispensaries that have received proper licensing from the state.

Based in Los Angeles, Calm by Wellness plans to be among the largest hemp-growing and CBD extraction facilities in the world by the end of 2019. The company sources their hemp from Colorado and uses clean CO2 technology to extract their CBD and other cannabinoids (no THC though!). The company is also GMP and ISO9001 food-grade manufacturer certified.


But because all these products are illegal according to the federal government, cannabis advocates are cautious. “By and large, the federal government is looking the other way,” says Paul Armentano, deputy director of the Washington, DC–based National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), but until federal laws are changed, “this administration or a future one could crack down on people who produce, manufacture, or use CBD, and the law would be on its side.”

In fact, not only will CBD not make you high, it has been proven to counteract the psychoactivity of THC. This property makes CBD highly useful as a medical treatment for a wide range of conditions. In terms of the CBD products you can buy, the amount of THC present varies from none at all in a pure CBD Isolate to a minimal amount (less than 0.3%) in a Full-Spectrum CBD product.


Currently, the only CBD product approved by the Food and Drug Administration is a prescription oil called Epidiolex. It's approved to treat two types of epilepsy. Aside from Epidiolex, state laws on the use of CBD vary. While CBD is being studied as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and anxiety, research supporting the drug's benefits is still limited.
×